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Down HomeJewish Life in North Carolina$
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Leonard Rogoff

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833759

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807895993_rogoff

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Creating Community: Citizens and Neighbors 1920–1968

Creating Community: Citizens and Neighbors 1920–1968

Chapter:
(p.192) 5 Creating Community: Citizens and Neighbors 1920–1968
Source:
Down Home
Author(s):

Leonard Rogoff

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807895993_rogoff.8

This chapter discusses Julienne Marder's move from Brooklyn to Brevard in 1939. Julienne was moving from a community where she was “an almost majority” to a town where she was “a small minority.” American-born and college-educated, the twenty-year-old felt comfortable in the small mountain town, but her mother Ida, born in Lithuania, found the move “traumatic.” Julienne's father Frank, a lawyer, had accepted a post at the new Ecusta Paper plant. After a visit by Rabbi Moses Jacobson of Temple Beth Ha-Tephila, they settled in Asheville, where they found an established Jewish community. A realtor suggested Biltmore Forest was convenient to the Brevard factory, but that upscale development excluded Jews.

Keywords:   Julienne Marder, Brooklyn, Brevard, almost majority, small minority, Rabbi Moses Jacobson

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