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Oregon and the Collapse of IllaheeU.S. Empire and the Transformation of an Indigenous World, 1792-1859$
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Gray H. Whaley

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833674

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898314_whaley

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Polaklie Illahee (Land of Darkness)

Polaklie Illahee (Land of Darkness)

Identity and Genocidal Culture in Oregon

Chapter:
(p.191) Chapter Seven Polaklie Illahee (Land of Darkness)
Source:
Oregon and the Collapse of Illahee
Author(s):

Gray H. Whaley

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898314_whaley.11

This chapter discusses the years between 1851 and 1858, which saw intermittent armed conflict among Native peoples and colonials in western Oregon Territory, and notes that in 1853, Congress formally separated Oregon and Washington territories at the Columbia River. It observes that conflicts produced tragic losses of life, land, and property for colonials and indigenes, and exacerbated intraterritorial political feuding and federal–territorial tensions. The chapter notes that during the tumultuous and often violent 1850s, colonists quickly claimed the lands of the Willamette and lower Columbia River valleys, then moved on to the southern valleys of the Umpqua, Rogue, and Coast Range Mountains. It observes that the newcomers found the valleys of southwestern Oregon attractive both because the climate was like “baby bear's porridge”: drier than the Willamette Valley, wetter than California's Sacramento Valley.

Keywords:   armed conflicts, colonials, indegenes, federal–territorial tensions, Willamette, Columbia River, Umpqua, Rogue, Coast Range Mountains, Oregon

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