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America Is the PrisonArts and Politics in Prison in the 1970s$
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Lee Bernstein

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833872

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898321_bernstein

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Cell Block Theater Entertainment, Liberation, and the Politics of Prison Theater

Cell Block Theater Entertainment, Liberation, and the Politics of Prison Theater

Chapter:
(p.129) Chapter Five Cell Block Theater Entertainment, Liberation, and the Politics of Prison Theater
Source:
America Is the Prison
Author(s):

Lee Bernstein

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898321_bernstein.9

This chapter focuses on the conference on theater in prison held by the Center for the Advanced Study in Theatre Arts (CASTA) at the City University of New York's Graduate Center. The event featured a spirited and divided debate about the goals of theater programs by the founders of many of the key programs then in existence, including the heads of the Theatre for the Forgotten, Cell Block Theatre, the Family, Geese Theatre Company, and the New York City Street Theatre Caravan. Stanley A. Waren, a professor at City College and the director of CASTA, summed up the varying and contradictory ways theater professionals and corrections officials thought about the value of theater programs. It reflected the political, humanistic, and professional contexts for theater during the 1970s.

Keywords:   theater in prison, Theatre Arts, CASTA, theater programs, Cell Block Theatre

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