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The Spotsylvania Campaign$
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Gary W. Gallagher

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780807824023

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898376_gallagher

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Stuart's Last Ride

Stuart's Last Ride

A Confederate View of Sheridan's Raid

Chapter:
(p.127) Stuart's Last Ride
Source:
The Spotsylvania Campaign
Author(s):

Robert E. L. Krick

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898376_gallagher.9

This chapter examines cavalry chief Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart's reaction to Philip Sheridan's raid against Richmond; the battle of Yellow Tavern and subsequent skirmishes associated with the raid; and the effect this action had on the larger campaign. Fighting between Union and Confederate horsemen in mid-May 1864 underscored how dramatically cavalry tactics had changed since the beginning of the war. Mounted charges almost always failed, most of the action occurred between troopers fighting on foot, and artillery played a much larger supporting role. Stuart's death was a major blow to Lee, but it had no long-term deleterious effect on the southern cavalry's efficiency because Wade Hampton maintained a high degree of competency in the mounted arm.

Keywords:   Civil War, military campaigns, J. E. B. Stuart, Philip Sheridan, Richmond, Yellow Tavern, cavalry, Wade Hampton

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