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Pickett's Charge—The Last Attack at Gettysburg$
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Earl J. Hess

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780807826485

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898390_hess

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 04 July 2022

The Repulse

The Repulse

Chapter:
(p.296) Chapter 8 The Repulse
Source:
Pickett's Charge—The Last Attack at Gettysburg
Author(s):

Earl J. Hess

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898390_hess.11

This chapter describes the repulse of Pickett's Charge. In that early phase of the attack, while Pickett was still moving east toward Emmitsburg Road, Wilcox and Lang assumed that the direction of march would always be straight ahead. They had not been informed about and did not surmise the need for Pickett to go left and connect with Pettigrew. Little did they know that they would soon be told to participate in the advance, playing out the final act of this tragic drama. The Wilcox–Lang attack was ordered too late, and was too poorly coordinated with Pickett's attack, to do much good. By the time the two understrength brigades closed with the Unionists, the tide had turned against Pickett. The Federal artillery had little difficulty blunting the advance and probably would have compelled the retreat without any involvement by the Union infantry.

Keywords:   Civil War, battle of Gettysburg, Wilcox, Lang

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