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Wars within a WarControversy and Conflict over the American Civil War$
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Joan Waugh and Gary W. Gallagher

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832752

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898444_waugh

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Hollywood Has It Both Ways: The Rise, Fall, and Reappearance of the Lost Cause in American Film

Hollywood Has It Both Ways: The Rise, Fall, and Reappearance of the Lost Cause in American Film

Chapter:
(p.157) Hollywood Has It Both Ways: The Rise, Fall, and Reappearance of the Lost Cause in American Film
Source:
Wars within a War
Author(s):

Gary W. Gallagher

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898444_waugh.11

This chapter traces the cinematic history of the heroic Lost Cause narrative created by ex-Confederates in the postwar years. It argues that after a long ascendancy established by The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939), the Lost Cause fell out of favor beginning in the mid-1960s—only to reappear in Gods and Generals, which was released shortly before Cold Mountain in 2003. Those two films revealed that competing memories of the Confederacy remained viable in a Hollywood that, just a few years earlier, seemingly had banished the Lost Cause.

Keywords:   cinematic history, Confederates, Civil War, Lost Cause narrative

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