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The Children of ChinatownGrowing Up Chinese American in San Francisco, 1850-1920$
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Wendy Rouse Jorae

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833131

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898581_jorae

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Constructing the Future

Constructing the Future

Chapter:
(p.215) Conclusion Constructing the Future
Source:
The Children of Chinatown
Author(s):

Wendy Rouse Jorae

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898581_jorae.11

This book chronicles the various ways that the children of early Chinatown found themselves caught in political and societal battles over immigration restriction, segregation, cultural identity, crime and violence, child labor, and other momentous personal and communal crises. Through it all, a medley of adults—ranging from Chinese parents and community leaders to white reformers, missionaries, politicians, journalists, and anti-Chinese activists—evaluated and framed the conditions of Chinese children in order to reach their own particular objectives, directly influencing the children's day-to-day lives in the process. While the adults advocated, quarreled, and maneuvered, the children struggled with the consequences of constantly changing perceptions and daily confronted the harsh realities of life in a segregated urban, ethnic enclave.

Keywords:   early Chinatown, societal battles, immigration restriction, segregation, cultural identity, child labor, Chinese children

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