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Roots of ConflictBritish Armed Forces and Colonial Americans, 1677-1763$
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Douglas Edward Leach

Print publication date: 1986

Print ISBN-13: 9780807842584

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898796_leach

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 30 July 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.163) Conclusion
Source:
Roots of Conflict
Author(s):

Douglas Edward Leach

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898796_leach.12

This book concludes with the events that occurred nearly a hundred years before the Declaration of Independence, redcoats in a colony were viewed by Americans as the arm of a repressive authority. It was in 1677 that Colonel Herbert Jeffreys implanted this perception by leading more than a thousand British soldiers into Virginia to restore royal authority in the wake of Bacon's Rebellion. “This extraordinary show of force,” as Wesley F. Craven has called it, could have been viewed by the many former adherents of Bacon only as a manifestation of the iron fist. Thereafter in America, redcoats represented authority—and distant authority at that. Every colonist, whatever his political stance, understood that the king's forces were there to prevent civil insurrection.

Keywords:   Declaration of Independence, redcoats, repressive authority, Colonel Herbert Jeffreys, British soldiers, Virginia, Bacon's Rebellion

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