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Working KnowledgeEmployee Innovation and the Rise of Corporate Intellectual Property, 1800-1930$
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Catherine L. Fisk

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833025

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807899069_fisk

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

If These Mill Owners Desire to Cripple a Man's Enterprise & His Energy & Intelligence, They Must Contract to That Effect

If These Mill Owners Desire to Cripple a Man's Enterprise & His Energy & Intelligence, They Must Contract to That Effect

Chapter:
(p.87) 3 If These Mill Owners Desire to Cripple a Man's Enterprise & His Energy & Intelligence, They Must Contract to That Effect
Source:
Working Knowledge
Author(s):

Catherine L. Fisk

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807899069_fisk.9

This chapter describes the changes in the law regarding employee trade secrets and noncompetition agreements and examines what it meant for craft workers in a number of industries. These legal changes represented an important break with the past and began a fundamental rethinking of the nature and ownership of workplace knowledge. In the late 1880s, the pace of change accelerated in favor of corporate control. The chapter also examines the importance of a particular vision of entrepreneurship to the law governing skilled white workers in the early postbellum years. As the economy industrialized, more people worked as employees of others. Once the small factories and workshops turned from war production to other enterprises, the question of who would own technological advances became quite pressing.

Keywords:   employee trade secrets, noncompetition agreements, craft workers, legal changes, workplace knowledge

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