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Creating a Confederate KentuckyThe Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State$
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Anne E. Marshall

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834367

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807899366_marshall

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Marked Change in the Sentiments of the People: Slavery, Civil War, and Emancipation in Kentucky, 1792–1865

Marked Change in the Sentiments of the People: Slavery, Civil War, and Emancipation in Kentucky, 1792–1865

Chapter:
(p.9) 1Marked Change in the Sentiments of the People: Slavery, Civil War, and Emancipation in Kentucky, 1792–1865
Source:
Creating a Confederate Kentucky
Author(s):

Anne E. Marshall

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807899366_marshall.5

This chapter shows the postwar social order Kentuckians faced that bore little resemblance to the world they had known before. As Kentucky Confederate Basil Duke wrote decades later in his memoirs, “No such metamorphosis, perhaps, has been produced in so brief a period,” with the exception of the French Revolution. “The life of the postbellum South,” he concluded, “no more resembled that of the [antebellum] than the life of the early settlers of this continent was like [that] they had left on the other side of the ocean.” Kentucky at the war's close was a world of disorder. Fields, farms, and infrastructure lay in ruins, as did the social and familial relationships of families and neighbors. There was the human cost as well. Nearly 30,000, or one in five, Kentuckians who fought had lost their lives.

Keywords:   postwar social order, Kentuckians, Kentucky Confederate, Basil Duke, metamorphosis

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