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Creating a Confederate KentuckyThe Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State$
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Anne E. Marshall

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834367

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807899366_marshall

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What Shall Be the Moral to Young Kentuckians? Civil War Memorial Activity in the Commonwealth, 1865–1895

What Shall Be the Moral to Young Kentuckians? Civil War Memorial Activity in the Commonwealth, 1865–1895

Chapter:
(p.81) 4What Shall Be the Moral to Young Kentuckians? Civil War Memorial Activity in the Commonwealth, 1865–1895
Source:
Creating a Confederate Kentucky
Author(s):

Anne E. Marshall

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807899366_marshall.8

This chapter highlights the importance of the Fourth of July 1865 to the divided populace of Kentucky. It was a day that reflected the fractures of the previous four years. Confederate sympathizer Lizzie Hardin noted that in Harrodsburg “the ‘glorious fourth’ passed . . . in a very inglorious manner, the citizens refusing to make any demonstration whatever. . . . I suppose the men thought there was no use in making a fuss over the day on which our forefathers gained their liberty.” She remarked contemptuously, however, that it was a different story only twelve miles away, at Camp Nelson, a Federal army base, where “the Negroes had a grand jubilee.” As the first Independence Day that had ever applied to them, July 4, 1865, was a day of particular rejoicing for black Kentuckians.

Keywords:   Fourth of July, populace of Kentucky, Confederate sympathizer, Lizzie Hardin, glorious fourth

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