Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Fruits of Their LaborAtlantic Coast Farmworkers and the Making of Migrant Poverty, 1870-1945$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Cindy Hahamovitch

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780807846391

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807899922_hahamovitch

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

The Union as Padrone: The “Underground Railroad” during the Second World War

The Union as Padrone: The “Underground Railroad” during the Second World War

Chapter:
(p.182) 8 The Union as Padrone: The “Underground Railroad” during the Second World War
Source:
The Fruits of Their Labor
Author(s):

Cindy Hahamovitch

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807899922_hahamovitch.13

This chapter shows how the ease with which the War Food Administration (WFA) commandeered the welfare apparatus set up for migrant farmworkers suggests the danger of dependence on the state. It also suggests an alternative course of action. If workers cannot depend on the state for aid and assistance, then by implication they must look to each other for strength. Yet nothing we have seen so far testifies to the power of farm labor unionism. For their efforts among farmworkers in 1913 Wheatland, California, Industrial Workers of the World organizers found themselves in prison on trumped-up murder charges. In 1934, the fledgling Agricultural and Cannery Workers' Industrial Union at Seabrook Farms had victory within its grasp one moment and found itself removed from the bargaining table the next. Farmworkers living in Farm Security Administration (FSA) migratory labor camps in 1942 used the security the camps afforded to bargain up their wages and, for their efforts, found themselves locked out of the camps and thrown into competition with workers imported from abroad.

Keywords:   War Food Administration, WFA, welfare apparatus, migrant farmworkers

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .