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Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism$
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Thomas W. Devine

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469602035

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469602042_Devine

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I Shall Run as an Independent Candidate for President: Launching Gideon's Army

I Shall Run as an Independent Candidate for President: Launching Gideon's Army

Chapter:
(p.35) 2 I Shall Run as an Independent Candidate for President: Launching Gideon's Army
Source:
Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism
Author(s):

Thomas W. Devine

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469602035.003.0002

This chapter examines why Michael Straight was worried after reading a New York Times translation of the Zhdanov manifesto in mid-October 1947. As he would reveal thirty-five years later, Straight was no stranger to the international communist movement. During the 1930s, he had been involved with Soviet espionage as an associate of the infamous “Cambridge spies,” Guy Burgess, Kim Philby, Donald Maclean, and Anthony Blunt. Disillusioned, he quietly broke with the Party in 1940 and thereafter remained wary of any entanglements with the Communists. He now sensed that the establishment of the Cominform would precipitate a major shift in the CPUSA line—one that would directly affect his magazine's editor, Henry Wallace. Straight immediately telephoned Harold Young, Wallace's “cheerful man Friday” and longtime political aidede-camp.

Keywords:   Michael Straight, Zhdanov manifesto, international communist movement, Soviet espionage, Cambridge spies

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