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Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism$
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Thomas W. Devine

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469602035

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469602042_Devine

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Like a Silken Thread Running Through the Whole Thing: Lead-Up to the National Convention and the Crafting of a Third Party Platform

Like a Silken Thread Running Through the Whole Thing: Lead-Up to the National Convention and the Crafting of a Third Party Platform

Chapter:
(p.123) 5 Like a Silken Thread Running Through the Whole Thing: Lead-Up to the National Convention and the Crafting of a Third Party Platform
Source:
Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism
Author(s):

Thomas W. Devine

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469602035.003.0005

This chapter discusses Henry Wallace's arrival by day coach at Philadelphia's Broad Street Station. Senator Glen Taylor of Idaho, his intended running mate, and a crowd of some fifteen hundred ardent supporters welcomed their standardbearer with songs, cheers, and waving banners. Acknowledging their adulation, a beaming Wallace declared, “I'm mighty glad to be here in Philadelphia. This convention is going to mark a great turning point not only in the history of the New Party, but also in the history of the world.” Wallace came to Philadelphia convinced that the independent liberals who had heretofore withheld their support were now ready to join his crusade. Likewise, he believed that liberal Democrats, having failed to block President Truman's nomination, were now ready to back him and the New Party. The convention, he predicted, would produce a flood of converts and “unleash liberal forces all over the country.”

Keywords:   Henry Wallace, Philadelphia, Broad Street Station, Senator Glen Taylor, New Party

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