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The Making of a Southern DemocracyNorth Carolina Politics from Kerr Scott to Pat McCrory$
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Tom Eamon

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781469606972

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469606989_eamon

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Seismic Shifts

Seismic Shifts

Chapter:
(p.287) Chapter Twelve Seismic Shifts
Source:
The Making of a Southern Democracy
Author(s):

Tom Eamon

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9781469606989_eamon.17

This chapter features a defining feature of 2008—the lack of incumbents eligible to run. No sitting president or vice president would be on the ballot. Governor Mike Easley was ineligible to run after two consecutive terms. Of North Carolina's three toptier races—president, governor, and U.S. Senate—only the race for senator featured an incumbent, and Elizabeth Dole appeared likely to win a second term. Despite the party's setbacks two years earlier, North Carolina remained a Republican-leaning state in presidential and senatorial races. The state seemed comfortable with Dole's issue positions. On a very few issues, her voting record had been less conservative than the voting records of Senators Jesse Helms and Richard Burr. She projected a moderate image to white women, a key voting bloc.

Keywords:   incumbents, president, vice president, Governor Mike Easley, Elizabeth Dole

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