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The Dynamic DecadeCreating the Sustainable Campus for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2001-2011$
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David R. Godschalk and Jonathan B. Howes

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781469607252

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469607269_Godschalk

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

Foreword

Foreword

The Chancellor's View

Chapter:
(p.1) Foreword
Source:
The Dynamic Decade
Author(s):

James Moeser

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469607252.003.0001

This book begins with August 2000. While Carolina had a great reputation nationally, it was a university with a decaying infrastructure. Little construction had taken place in the previous thirty years. The deferred maintenance backlog was staggering. Two years prior to the author's arrival, a construction bond issue had been defeated. However, in 2000, an enormous $3.1 billion Higher Education Bond Issue for the UNC system and the North Carolina Community College system was set to go before the voters in the November election. It would not be an overstatement to say that the future of the University hung in the balance of the November election. In November, 2000, the voters of North Carolina overwhelmingly approved the largest higher education construction bond issue ever passed by any state, passing in all 100 counties with a seventy-five percent plurality.

Keywords:   Carolina, decaying infrastructure, university, construction bond issue, UNC system, North Carolina Community College system

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