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Sister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America$
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Paula M. Kane

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469607603

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469607610_Kane

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

{} Now You Are My Thorn, but Soon You Shall Be My Lily of Delight

{} Now You Are My Thorn, but Soon You Shall Be My Lily of Delight

The Transformation of Margaret Reilly

Chapter:
(p.25) {1} Now You Are My Thorn, but Soon You Shall Be My Lily of Delight
Source:
Sister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America
Author(s):

Paula M. Kane

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469607603.003.0002

This chapter shows how Margaret Reilly received a nudge toward sainthood on an ordinary day in 1917 while cooking dinner. Although the kitchen seems an unlikely place for a mystical encounter, Margaret, while stooping over the oven to prepare a fish supper with her mother, felt a sharp pain over her heart and saw a three-dimensional crucifix emerging in blood. Her mother quickly put her to bed and immediately telephoned their pastor. This event was not Margaret's first divine communication. Four years earlier, in November 1913, a two-inch-long red cross had appeared on her breast. On that day, she recalled, “It pleased our dear Lord to send me a very severe illness for which He prepared me in a most extraordinary way.”

Keywords:   Margaret Reilly, mystical encounter, crucifix, divine communication

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