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Sister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America$
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Paula M. Kane

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469607603

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469607610_Kane

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

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Devotional Culture in American Catholicism

Chapter:
(p.189) {5} Cor Jesu Regnabit
Source:
Sister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America
Author(s):

Paula M. Kane

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469607603.003.0006

This chapter regards Sister Thorn and women religious as producers and consumers of devotional and religious goods that served the intimate needs of Catholics in crisis situations and established connections between the local and the universal church. Margaret not only joined in the Sacred Heart devotion at the parish level, but she also made badges of the Sacred Heart at the convent. These were applied to health emergencies and for healing purposes but did not exist for reasons of profit. The badges did not have an uncontested existence, however. They soon met with resistance from the archdiocese because they challenged the authority of the church hierarchy (clergy) as the sole mediators of divine power. Unlike a scapular badge, which required a priest's blessing, Margaret's badges came already blessed, she said, by the Lord himself.

Keywords:   Sister Thorn, women religious, Catholics, universal church, Sacred Heart, divine power

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