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Jim Crow WisdomMemory and Identity in Black America since 1940$
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Jonathan Scott Holloway

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469610702

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469610719_Holloway

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

Introduction the Scars of Memory

Introduction the Scars of Memory

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction the Scars of Memory
Source:
Jim Crow Wisdom
Author(s):

Jonathan Scott Holloway

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469610702.003.0001

This introductory chapter sets out the book's purpose, which is to listen to the black voice and the stories that it tells over the course of the long second half of the twentieth century. More specifically, the book observes how this voice is articulated through personal and public memories, academic and popular literature, dance, film, and heritage tourism, all the while examining how these ways of self-imagining are connected to a black identity that is engaged in a battle to secure full citizenship rights. Relying on many different types of sources helps us develop a portrait of black memory work that is appropriately complex, reflecting the consistencies and contradictions embedded in the construction of the African American character.

Keywords:   race memory, black voice, black identity, civil rights

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