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The Tuscarora WarIndians, Settlers, and the Fight for the Carolina Colonies$
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David La Vere

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469610900

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469610917_LaVere

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King Hancock and Core Tom

King Hancock and Core Tom

The Defenders

Chapter:
(p.39) Chapter Two King Hancock and Core Tom
Source:
The Tuscarora War
Author(s):

David La Vere

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469610900.003.0004

This chapter discusses the Unkwa-hunwa, meaning “the Real People.” Some have said their name meant “Hemp Gatherers”; others “Shirt Wearers.” The Europeans in North Carolina just called them Tuscaroras. Whatever their description, they were the Indian power in eastern North Carolina, the largest and strongest of all east of the North Carolina Appalachians and a force to be reckoned with. The Tuscaroras were an Iroquoian people, speaking an Iroquoian dialect, and were originally from the area south of the Great Lakes in present-day New York. Around A.D. 500 they began migrating out. Tuscarora oral tradition says that Tarenhiawagen—the Master of Life and Ruler of Skyland—led the Tuscaroras west to the Mississippi River where they split, some going west across the river and some remaining east.

Keywords:   Unkwa-hunwa, the Real People, Hemp Gatherers, Shirt Wearers, Tuscaroras

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