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The Formation of CandombléVodun History and Ritual in Brazil$
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Luis Nicolau Pares

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469610924

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469610931_Pares

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The Formation of a Jeje Ethnic Identity in Bahia in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

The Formation of a Jeje Ethnic Identity in Bahia in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Chapter:
(p.35) 2 The Formation of a Jeje Ethnic Identity in Bahia in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
Source:
The Formation of Candomblé
Author(s):

Luis Nicolau Parés

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469610924.003.0002

This chapter shows that the black and mestizo free and freed population was greater than the slave population during the nineteenth century. The intent of this chapter is not to enter into a detailed discussion of this data but to point out certain important generalities. Notably that the percentage of Africans among the freed population was less than among the slave population; from this one may infer that the Creoles born in the country and, above all, the mestizos, had a greater chance to obtain liberty. This uneven distribution indicates a hierarchized system of social relations that privileged the Creole to the detriment of the African foreigner. In addition, we see that, among the Africans, those from Central Africa seem to have been the most disadvantaged. Also important is the different use of the ethnoracial terminology according to document type. While the inventories identify a high percentage of slaves as “gentio da Costa,” this category is almost nonexistent in the letters of manumission, where the term Mina seems to be substituted for it.

Keywords:   freed population, slave population, Africans, Creoles, Mina, gentio da Costa

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