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Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861–1867Series 3, Volume 2: Land and Labor, 1866-1867$
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Rene Hayden, Anthony E. Kaye, and Kate Masur

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469607429

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469611099_Hayden

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Labor and Family Life

Labor and Family Life

Chapter:
(p.553) 5 Labor and Family Life
Source:
Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861–1867
Author(s):

René Hayden

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469607429.003.0006

This chapter describes the effects of emancipation on family life for former slaves. The chance to reunite with spouses, children, and other family members was one of the most well-received consequences of emancipation. The understanding of freedpeope of family took expansive forms and intersected with their work relations in numerous ways. In slavery, they had built up relations of extended kinship that defined families within and across plantation boundaries. In freedom, they drew upon family close-by and far-flung in their efforts to secure a livelihood. Most fundamentally, kinship provided the basis for organizing the households that would be essential to freedpeople's livelihoods.

Keywords:   emancipation, family life, former slaves, feedpeople, kinship, plantation

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