Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
This Violent EmpireThe Birth of an American National Identity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Carroll Smith-Rosenberg

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832967

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9780807832967.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 07 July 2022

Asculinity and Masquerade

Asculinity and Masquerade

Chapter:
(p.191) Prologue Two Asculinity and Masquerade
Source:
This Violent Empire
Author(s):

Carroll Smith-Rosenberg

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9780807832967.003.0006

This chapter explores how and why New York City's Tammany Society appropriated the tradition of the Republic's middling classes. Mimicking Native Americans, these new republicans played at being braves and sachems in public and often political settings. They did so at great affairs of state and on patriotic holidays. However, these performances were belied by their condemnation of Native Americans as savage and inhuman. Why would elite and middling men play the surrogate, the counterfeit Indian? Why, at the very time that Washington's administration had launched an all-out military assault along the western frontier, would European Americans make such festive masquerades central to their new sense of national identity?

Keywords:   New York City, Creek warriors, Native Americans, Tammany Society, national identity

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .