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Freedom’s DebtThe Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752$
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William A. Pettigrew

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469611815

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469611815.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

The Strategies

The Strategies

“As Witches Do the Devil”

Chapter:
(p.114) (p.115) Four The Strategies
Source:
Freedom’s Debt
Author(s):

William A. Pettigrew

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469611815.003.0005

This chapter compares the political strategies of the separate traders and the Royal African Company: their respective political actions, mediated by political ideologies and in response to changing political and constitutional circumstances, which sought to engineer regulatory outcomes to satisfy their different interests. The principal structural change in this period was parliamentary supremacy over state regulation of the national economy. Because the monopolistic African Company expressed the monarchical dominion and the separate traders expressed the use of parliamentary influence, the shift overwhelmingly favored the separate traders’ campaign to deregulate the slave trade.

Keywords:   independent slave traders, transatlantic slave trade, lobbying strategy, political strategies, Royal African Company, slave trade deregulation

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