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Framing Chief LeschiNarratives and the Politics of Historical Justice$
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Lisa Blee

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781469612843

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469612843.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.184) (p.185) Conclusion
Source:
Framing Chief Leschi
Author(s):

Lisa Blee

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469612843.003.0008

This chapter presents concluding thoughts about Chief Leschi's case and the Historical Court. The Historical Court revealed the tensions and contradictions of historical justice. It represented a victory for Leschi's descendants, a call to action for Native elders, a boon to legal authority, and a confirmation of American settlers' just intentions and liberal achievements in the region. Leschi symbolized another set of contradictions. He was a model for resistance to U.S. domination and an example of a peaceful arbiter who valued cooperation and accommodation. Leschi signified the enduring active presence of the past as well as an attempt to seize control of it, a representative of a shared, multicultural collective memory and evidence of its impossibility in a settler state.

Keywords:   Washington State, Historical Court, Inquiry and Justice, Chief Leschi, historical justice

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