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AlcoholA History$
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Rod Phillips

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781469617602

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469617602.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Greece and Rome

Greece and Rome

The Superiority of Wine

Chapter:
(p.25) 2 Greece and Rome
Source:
Alcohol
Author(s):

Rod Phillips

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469617602.003.0003

This chapter looks at the history of alcohol in Greece and Rome. While the rest of the ancient world drank beer, it was not consumed at all in Greece and Roman Italy. Romans and Greeks of all social classes consumed only wine, and constructed ideological and medical arguments that beer had harmful properties in general and was particularly unfit for civilized peoples such as themselves. They exported wine to predominantly beer-drinking societies throughout the Mediterranean region and beyond, and later they transferred knowledge of vine cultivation and winemaking to western and central Europe. Between 500 bc and ad 100, wine production spread across Europe to regions ranging from Spain and Portugal in the west, to modern Hungary in the east, and from England in the north to Crete in the south.

Keywords:   alcohol consumption, drinking, alcoholic beverages, wine production, vine cultivation, winemaking

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