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Mobilizing New YorkAIDS, Antipoverty, and Feminist Activism$
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Tamar W. Carroll

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469619880

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469619880.001.0001

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Everything Then Made Sense

Everything Then Made Sense

Bridging the Neighborhood and Women’s Movements

Chapter:
(p.79) Chapter Three Everything Then Made Sense
Source:
Mobilizing New York
Author(s):

Tamar W. Carroll

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469619880.003.0003

This chapter explains how federally funded community organizing programs directed Williamsburg-Greenpoint residents' anger against the city government, allowing the neighborhood to evade the violent white racial backlash against the school busing that broke out in nearby Canarsie in 1972. Building on this mobilization and using War on Poverty funds, MYF social worker Jan Peterson worked closely with a group of Italian American women to open the neighborhood's first day care and senior citizens' center—Small World Day Care and the Swinging Sixties Senior Center. The two became a contentious project opposed by many male leaders in the neighborhood—one that drew women to join the National Congress of Neighborhood Women (NCNW), which Peterson founded in Brooklyn in 1974.

Keywords:   community organizing programs, Williamsburg-Greenpoint residents, War on Poverty, Jan Peterson, Small World Day Care, Swinging Sixties Senior Center

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