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Guaranteed PureThe Moody Bible Institute, Business, and the Making of Modern Evangelicalism$
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Timothy Gloege

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469621012

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621012.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 13 October 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Guaranteed Pure
Author(s):

Timothy E. W. Gloege

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621012.003.0010

This introductory chapter charts a brief history of how American Protestantism had developed in conjunction with modern consumer capitalism. There are many points of entry to this corporate evangelical network, but the story that follows focuses on one of its key institutions, the Moody Bible Institute (MBI) in Chicago. The MBI was founded by the salesman-turned-revivalist Dwight L. Moody, the most important evangelical of the late nineteenth century. He ingeniously weaved disparate ideas drawn from business and religion into a compelling, if unstable, form of evangelical Protestantism. After Moody's death in 1899, a second generation of evangelicals led by Henry Parsons Crowell transformed MBI in significant ways. They shifted focus from converting the working classes to influencing middle-class Protestantism and swapped their overarching metaphor of industrial work with modern consumption.

Keywords:   American Protestantism, modern consumer capitalism, Dwight L. Moody, Henry Parsons Crowell, Moody Bible Institute, MBI, Chicago, corporate evangelism

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