Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Carolina in CrisisCherokees, Colonists, and Slaves in the American Southeast, 1756-1763$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniel J. Tortora

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469621227

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621227.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

A General Conflagration

A General Conflagration

The French and Indian War Begins

Chapter:
(p.25) 2 A General Conflagration
Source:
Carolina in Crisis
Author(s):

Daniel J. Tortora

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621227.003.0003

This chapter describes how ongoing tensions between the British and the French, as well as the internal tensions between the colonies of Virginia and South Carolina, would lead to the souring of their alliances with the Indians. Despite the construction of Fort Loudoun in the Cherokee Overhills, Cherokee frustration with the trade, regulated and based out of South Carolina, was building, especially in Great Tellico and Chota. Circumstances had not yet pushed the Cherokees to break with the English, but constantly being misunderstood and mistreated caused their resentment and frustration to slowly build. Indian anger simmered as the war between France and England escalated. The American Southeast inched closer to open war.

Keywords:   Virginia, South Carolina, Fort Loudoun, French and Indian War, American Southeast

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .