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Commanders and Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire$
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Fred K. Drogula

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469621265

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621265.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Fundamental Concepts of Authority in Early Rome (to 367 BC)

Fundamental Concepts of Authority in Early Rome (to 367 BC)

Chapter:
(p.46) 2 Fundamental Concepts of Authority in Early Rome (to 367 BC)
Source:
Commanders and Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire
Author(s):

Fred K. Drogula

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621265.003.0002

This chapter examines the most basic and fundamental concepts of authority that defined the early military commander in Roman tradition, and it attempts to create a foundation from which to chart the evolution of military command in later periods. More specifically, the chapter looks at the three most fundamental types of authority exercised by military commanders: the potestas they (eventually) held as civil magistrates, the auspicium they possessed as intermediaries between the state and its gods, and the imperium they wielded as military commanders. The imperium in particular is defined as the singular and indivisible authority of military command that was forbidden within the civilian sphere of Rome except in dire emergencies.

Keywords:   early Roman military commander, evolution of military command, potestas, auspicium, imperium, civilian authority, civil magistrates, military commanders

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