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Commanders and Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire$
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Fred K. Drogula

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469621265

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621265.001.0001

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The Development of the Classical Constitution (367 to 197 BC)

The Development of the Classical Constitution (367 to 197 BC)

Chapter:
(p.182) 4 The Development of the Classical Constitution (367 to 197 BC)
Source:
Commanders and Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire
Author(s):

Fred K. Drogula

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621265.003.0004

This chapter explores the development of the classical system of Rome’s military command (which included two consuls, a growing number of praetors, and the occasional dictator and master of horse) and argues that it took shape over a long process of experimentation and innovation through which Rome’s structure of military command gradually evolved. The Roman government and its practice of military command underwent considerable development between 367 and 197 BC, as the Romans sought solutions to new problems and experimented with new ideas. These changes were not carefully planned public policy decisions, but experiments with individual aspects of military command that over time took on greater importance than was perhaps originally intended.

Keywords:   Roman military command, Roman government, military command structure, development of military practices, public policy decisions, classical Roman constitution

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