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Commanders and Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire$
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Fred K. Drogula

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469621265

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621265.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Augustan Manipulation of Traditional Ideas of Provincial Governance

Augustan Manipulation of Traditional Ideas of Provincial Governance

Chapter:
(p.345) 7. Augustan Manipulation of Traditional Ideas of Provincial Governance
Source:
Commanders and Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire
Author(s):

Fred K. Drogula

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469621265.003.0007

This chapter examines Augustus’s role as a provincial commander and his contribution to the evolution of Roman provincial command. In particular, Augustus took advantage of changes in the fundamental, underlying concepts that had shaped and defined provincial command to give himself a radically new but traditional-sounding position as Rome’s main commander or imperator. The gradual evolution of Roman thinking about imperium and the provincia in the last two centuries of the republic gave Augustus different interpretations of each concept to choose from, and selecting those ideas that best served his purposes, he was able to establish what would become of the imperial monarchy.

Keywords:   Augustus, imperator, Roman provincial command, imperium, provincia, imperial monarchy

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