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Selling EmpireIndia in the Making of Britain and America, 1600-1830$
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Jonathan Eacott

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469622309

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469622309.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 29 June 2022

A Company to Fear

A Company to Fear

India and the American Revolution

Chapter:
(p.168) 4 A Company to Fear
Source:
Selling Empire
Author(s):

Jonathan Eacott

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469622309.003.0005

The Seven Years’ War and British conquest in Bengal furthered major constitutional questions about the similarities and differences of British rule in India and America, and reinvigorated plans for greater metropolitan control over imperial trade and administration. The Calico Acts and the ensuing regulation had long before created a system and precedent of colonial consumption to support the East India Company. The coincident timing of the news of a famine in Company-governed Bengal with the passage of the Tea Act granting the Company the ability to dump tea on American markets created deep concern in the colonies. Patriots saw the American Revolution as necessary to avoid a similar fate to Bengalis who suffered not just hypothetically, but physically under the monopolies and government of the Company and its servants.

Keywords:   Seven Years’ War, American Revolution, East India Company, Bengal, Patriots, Tea Act, Imperial Trade, Colonial Consumption, Famine, British Constitution, Monopolies

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