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Rethinking Slave Rebellion in CubaLa Escalera and the Insurgencies of 1841-1844$
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Aisha K. Finch

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469622347

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469622347.001.0001

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And the Women Also Knew

And the Women Also Knew

The Gendered Terrain of Insurgency

Chapter:
(p.141) Chapter Five And the Women Also Knew
Source:
Rethinking Slave Rebellion in Cuba
Author(s):

Aisha K. Finch

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469622347.003.0006

This chapter begins by exploring the gendered intersection of betrayal, infidelity, antiblack violence, and state terror in the historical memory of 1844. Alongside the trope of duplicity, the most pervasive theme of black women's involvement in this and other slave movements is their silence and invisibility. This chapter calls attention to the scores of rural black women who molded the 1844 resistance in visible and public ways, and to those who shaped the movement through means often obscured or unnoticed. The chapter focuses special attention on small groups of women who stand out in the insurgent organizing, some of whom were cited as rebel queens and others of whom were named as field lieutenants or captains. But the chapter also looks at those women who negotiated complex relationships to the movement and to masculine-defined practices of freedom in ways that were less visible in the trial record, yet arguably map out new ways to think about movement participation.

Keywords:   gender, black women, 1844 resistance, movement participation, rebel queens, slave movements

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