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The Last PuritansMainline Protestants and the Power of the Past$
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Margaret Bendroth

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469624006

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469624006.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

The Pilgrim Jubilee and What Came of It

The Pilgrim Jubilee and What Came of It

Chapter:
(p.71) Chapter Four The Pilgrim Jubilee and What Came of It
Source:
The Last Puritans
Author(s):

Margaret Bendroth

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469624006.003.0005

This chapter illustrates how the past had become something to purchase and own in the late nineteenth century. Like many Americans in the late nineteenth century, Congregationalists had begun to memorialize their past, uniting around symbolic objects like the Pilgrim jubilee coin and joining in corporate rituals honoring Forefathers' Day. The coin's more practical purpose, however, was to help with fundraising in order to meet the financial goals set by the Albany Convention and the Boston Council. While the coin itself did not sell well, it is still a useful metaphor for economic and cultural changes taking place among Congregationalists and in American society in the Gilded Age.

Keywords:   Pilgrim Jubilee, Pilgrim jubilee coin, Gilded Age, memorializing the past, symbolic objects, late nineteenth century, economic changes, cultural changes

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