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From South Texas To the NationThe Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century$
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John Weber

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469625232

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469625232.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.223) Epilogue
Source:
From South Texas To the Nation
Author(s):

John Weber

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469625232.003.0009

This chapter examines the continued importance of this form of labor relations in the years since the 1960s, as South Texas has continued to serve as a model for employers elsewhere eager to avail themselves of poorly-paid workers who lack the ability to claim the basic rights of citizenship. The lessons learned in the fields of South Texas, in other words, were not only borrowed by agricultural employers. Instead, employers have increasingly sought to use the model of farmworker treatment and apply it to workers far removed from the fields. Industrial and service employers continue to try and emulate the enforced powerlessness of agricultural workers, even if they no longer consciously point to South Texas as their explicit model. The Epilogue examines the continued resonance and importance of this model of labor relations as it has moved beyond the agricultural realm and into service and industrial employment.

Keywords:   Migrant Stream, Wailuku Agribusiness, Farmworkerization, Labor contractors, Walmart, Tyson Chicken, Cheap labor, Agricultural labor practices

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