Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Ku-KluxThe Birth of the Klan during Reconstruction$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Elaine Frantz Parsons

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469625423

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469625423.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Ku-Klux Skepticism and Denial in Reconstruction-Era Public Discourse

Ku-Klux Skepticism and Denial in Reconstruction-Era Public Discourse

Chapter:
(p.181) Five Ku-Klux Skepticism and Denial in Reconstruction-Era Public Discourse
Source:
Ku-Klux
Author(s):

Elaine Frantz Parsons

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469625423.003.0005

Klan denial remained remarkably persistent throughout and after the Klan period. As reams of testimony and massive stores of physical evidence of Klan violence poured into Washington, D.C., not only Democrats but sometimes even Republicans expressed regular doubt about its authenticity. Yet this was a period of great growth in professional journalism, and the reports newspapers were providing were of unprecedented quality and detail. Federal and state governments’ information-gathering mechanisms likewise expanded during this period, partly in order to deal with the challenge of proving the existence of the Klan. The image of the Klan as at once apparent and invisible, and the status of Klan accounts as detailed and rigorously documented yet also incredible, was a productive feature of Klan discourse. The very ambiguity of the Klan’s status played an important role in the reconciliation of North and South.

Keywords:   Klan denial, trauma, Ku-Klux Klan, lying, objectivity, Horace Greeley, collective memory, partisan press, Election of 1872

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .