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Back Channel To CubaThe Hidden History of Negotiations between Washington and Havana$
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William M. LeoGrande and Peter Kornbluh

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781469626604

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469626604.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 04 July 2022

George W. Bush

George W. Bush

Turning Back the Clock

Chapter:
(p.345) 8. George W. Bush
Source:
Back Channel To Cuba
Author(s):

William M. LeoGrande

Peter Kornbluh

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469626604.003.0008

This chapter explores President George W. Bush’s policy toward Cuba and Latin America in general. Against the backdrop of the war in Iraq and U.S. military operations in the name of freedom, “regime change” remained the unwavering objective of U.S. policy during Bush’s presidency. Convinced that stepped-up economic pressure and aid to Cuban dissidents would collapse the regime despite fifty years of experience to the contrary, Bush’s foreign policy team had no interest in dialogue with a government they were confident they could eliminate. The task of sustaining engagement with the island over the next eight years would thus fall to others. Bush’s uncompromising policy was rooted not only in the messianic Wilsonianism of his foreign policy but also in his close ties to Miami’s most conservative Cuban Americans.

Keywords:   George W. Bush, Bush’s policy, foreign policy, regime change, Bush’s presidency, Cuban Americans

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