Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dollar Diplomacy by ForceNation-Building and Resistance in the Dominican Republic$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ellen D. Tillman

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469626956

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469626956.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 07 July 2022

Regional Negotiation and Resistance

Regional Negotiation and Resistance

The “Moralizing” versus the Expedient

Chapter:
Chapter Five Regional Negotiation and Resistance
Source:
Dollar Diplomacy by Force
Author(s):

Ellen D. Tillman

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469626956.003.0006

The end of World War I brought an opening for international attention to the U.S. military occupation of the Dominican Republic, as well as for Dominican resistance. These changes forced U.S. officers in the occupied country to account for their lack of progress in reforming Dominican government. They responded with an absolute refusal to abandon their experiment, instead blaming Dominicans and a lack of consistent resources for occupation failures. Rather than reform their approach, military governors shuffled in after the war insisted on "reform" that emphasized the original occupation plan, alongside reforms to improve Dominican society morally. Embedded in this now long-term set of power relationships, Dominicans and U.S. officers who ran the constabulary throughout the country coped increasingly through diverse local and regional negotiations. These fractured policies strengthened the local functionality of the occupation while at the same time serving to empower Dominicans within the ranks of the constabulary.

Keywords:   Constabulary, Dominican Republic, Military occupation

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .