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Lincoln and the Politics of SlaveryThe Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the Union$
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Daniel W. Crofts

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469627311

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627311.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

The Seward Amendment

The Seward Amendment

Chapter:
(p.106) 5 The Seward Amendment
Source:
Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery
Author(s):

Daniel W. Crofts

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627311.003.0005

Chapter Five centers on New York senator William Henry Seward, soon to be Lincoln’s secretary of state, who recognized sooner than most other Republicans that the secession epidemic in the Deep South created an imminent threat of war. To counteract the most emotionally charged issue that divided North and South, he drafted the constitutional amendment to bar any interference with slavery in the states where it existed. Seward reminded white Southerners that their rights within the Union were secure, whereas “the horrors of civil war” would make any of their perceived grievances look trivial by comparison.

Keywords:   William Henry Seward, Thurlow Weed, Abraham Lincoln, John Greenleaf Whittier, Daniel Webster, Committee of Thirteen, territorial compromise, Crittenden Compromise, constitutional amendment

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