Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Right MovesThe Conservative Think Tank in American Political Culture since 1945$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jason Stahl

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469627861

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627861.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Think Tanks, New Democrats, and Committed Conservatives

Think Tanks, New Democrats, and Committed Conservatives

Chapter:
(p.134) 4 Think Tanks, New Democrats, and Committed Conservatives
Source:
Right Moves
Author(s):

Jason Stahl

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627861.003.0004

This chapter details two think tank institutional developments of the late 1980s and 1990s which furthered conservatism during this time. First, the chapter details the emergence of the Democratic Leadership Council to show the multiple ways in which this group – and its more formal think tank arm the Progressive Policy Institute – furthered conservatism. Far from a halt to the conservative trend of the Reagan years, the group's development of the political identity “New Democrat” helped create a space for conservatism within the Democratic Party. This chapter details the development of this new identity and its power under the presidency of Bill Clinton – namely how it was wielded to pass a host of long-term conservative public policy goals including the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and welfare reform. Secondly, this chapter details how Republican-aligned conservative think tanks—rather than compromising with a Democratic president—continued to advance their agenda within the state (through Congress) and through “civil society,” with the emergence of new conservative media outlets to disseminate their messages.

Keywords:   1980s, 1990s, Democratic Leadership Council, Progressive Policy Institute, Conservatism, New Democrat, Democratic Party, Bill Clinton, NAFTA, Welfare Reform

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .