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Good Guys with GunsThe Appeal and Consequences of Concealed Carry$
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Angela Stroud

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469627892

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627892.001.0001

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Self-Defense and Personal Responsibility

Self-Defense and Personal Responsibility

Chapter:
(p.112) 5 Self-Defense and Personal Responsibility
Source:
Good Guys with Guns
Author(s):

Angela Stroud

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627892.003.0005

This chapter examines how ideas about crime and criminals are shaped by neoliberal cultural discourses of personal responsibility that not only justify why people need to be armed but also rationalize inequality and obscure the social reproduction privilege. Respondents’ perceptions of what motivates criminals is a central focus of the chapter, including a race and class analysis of what makes school shooters different from gang members, and how perceptions of poverty are tied to ideas about criminality. Most respondents believe that criminals are simply looking for an easy way to survive, something they see as being in stark contrast to their own commitment to personal responsibility and hard work. Their CHLs and guns more generally are extensions of a commitment to self-reliance that in its most extreme form manifests in elaborate disaster preparedness plans.

Keywords:   Criminals, Personal Responsibility, Self-Reliance, Neoliberalism, Social Inequality, School Shooters, Gang Members, Disaster Preparedness, Survivalism

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