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A Place Called Appomattox$
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William Marvel

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469628394

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469628394.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

The Railroad

The Railroad

Chapter:
(p.24) 2 The Railroad
Source:
A Place Called Appomattox
Author(s):

William Marvel

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469628394.003.0002

As Clover Hill grows from a stage stop into a hamlet surrounding a county seat, an emancipated slave named Charles Diuguid establishes his blacksmith shop in the village. Samuel McDearmon attempts to reach for additional entrepreneurial opportunities. When the Southside Railroad approaches Appomattox County, he wins a contract to build the approaches and the massive brick pylons over High Bridge, which will carry the line over the Appomattox River east of Farmville. Trying to meet the contract drains McDearmon's resources to the point that he is forced to liquidate his holdings at Appomattox Court House. The railroad ultimately sweeps through Appomattox County three miles away from the courthouse village, stopping at what would become Appomattox Station and drawing away business in a trend that will eventually sound the death knell for that community.

Keywords:   Southside Railroad, High Bridge, Appomattox River, Appomattox Station, antebellum freedmen

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