Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
American Studies Encounters the Middle East$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alex Lubin and Marwan M. Kraidy

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469628844

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469628844.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 07 July 2020

Call and Response, Radical Belonging, and Arabic Hip-Hop in “the West”

Call and Response, Radical Belonging, and Arabic Hip-Hop in “the West”

Chapter:
(p.106) Call and Response, Radical Belonging, and Arabic Hip-Hop in “the West”
Source:
American Studies Encounters the Middle East
Author(s):

Rayya El Zein

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469628844.003.0005

Enthusiasm in Western media and the academe about the paradigm-shifting events of the Arab uprisings of 2010-2013 has been marked by notable attention to creative cultural production by Arab youth. Perhaps no single genre has received more of this attention than Arabic rap and hip hop. However, despite the political attentiveness this recent enthusiasm has displayed, most of this literature has not yet addressed how the particularities of the processes of cultural production create experiences that help define specific political bearing. I want to further this conversation by asking: how can some rap and hip hop in Arabic be understood as specific political practice? What can analyzing this cultural production reveal about the emergent forms of political belonging enacted and developed in these practices? Focusing on performatic strategies in rap concerts, I explore different uses of call and response, costuming, “warm up” and “cool down” techniques to theorize how rap performances might work to build political community, what I call here “radical belonging.”

Keywords:   Cultural production, Arabic rap and hip hop, performance, community, identity, the multitude

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .