Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
You Can't Eat FreedomSoutherners and Social Justice After the Civil Rights Movement$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Greta de Jong

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469629308

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469629308.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

They Could Make Some Decisions

They Could Make Some Decisions

The War on Poverty and Community Action

Chapter:
(p.62) Chapter 3 They Could Make Some Decisions
Source:
You Can't Eat Freedom
Author(s):

Greta de Jong

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469629308.003.0004

This chapter examines the impact of the War on Poverty in rural southern plantation counties and the threat that it posed to the people in power. Direct access to the Office of Economic Opportunity’s grant-making divisions enabled black residents to bypass racist local officials who had previously controlled access to federal assistance, bringing millions of dollars into impoverished areas. Antipoverty initiatives such as the North Bolivar County Farm Cooperative and the Tufts-Delta Health Center provided services and job opportunities for poor people, encouraging displaced laborers to stay in the South and work to improve conditions in their communities. The OEO’s mandate to include representatives of the poor in program planning enabled rural black southerners to directly influence the distribution of resources in their communities for the first time in their lives, threatening the interests of regional elites. Opponents attacked antipoverty programs, using exaggerated charges of corruption and mismanagement to paint the War on Poverty as a waste of taxpayer money and undermine public support for the effort.

Keywords:   Antipoverty programs, Community action programs, North Bolivar County Farm Cooperative, Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO), Tufts-Delta Health Center, War on Poverty

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .