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Reparation and ReconciliationThe Rise and Fall of Integrated Higher Education$
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Christi M. Smith

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469630687

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469630687.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 04 April 2020

A Scarcity of Great Men

A Scarcity of Great Men

Educating Leaders at Howard and Oberlin

Chapter:
(p.173) Chapter Six A Scarcity of Great Men
Source:
Reparation and Reconciliation
Author(s):

Christi M. Smith

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469630687.003.0006

Chapter 6 explores the paths Howard and Oberlin took to attain elite status. The field of higher education increasingly emphasized liberal arts education for white elites and industrial training for blacks. Yet both Howard and Oberlin framed their students as having a unique capacity for leadership. Indeed, until the early 1900s, Howard was more likely than Oberlin to be linked in the press to the universities that have since been dubbed “the Ivy League” than to other predominantly black schools. Both Howard and Oberlin prioritized masculinity. While neither banned women, as did other universities, women were deprioritized in the colleges’ ascension to elite status.

Keywords:   Howard, Oberlin, men’s higher education, masculinity, gender coeducation, integration

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