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American Civil WarsThe United States, Latin America, Europe, and the Crisis of the 1860s$
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Don H. Doyle

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781469631097

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469631097.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

The Civil War in the United States and the Crisis of Slavery in Brazil

The Civil War in the United States and the Crisis of Slavery in Brazil

Chapter:
(p.222) Chapter Eleven The Civil War in the United States and the Crisis of Slavery in Brazil
Source:
American Civil Wars
Author(s):

Rafael Marquese

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469631097.003.0012

With Cuban slavery on the path to extinction, the Empire of Brazil stood as the last nation sanctioning slavery. Rafael Marquese’s essay shows that Brazil’s political leaders were keenly aware of the implications of the Union’s emancipation policy, and its ultimate victory, for their own country. Brazilians also followed closely the post-emancipation conditions of the South and debated what lessons it held for Brazil. In 1871, alone in a world that had repudiated slavery, Brazil passed its own free-womb law, which spelled the eventual end of slavery in Brazil, and all the Americas.

Keywords:   Brazil, slavery, free-womb law, emancipation

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