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The Battle of Peach Tree CreekHood's First Effort to Save Atlanta$
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Earl J. Hess

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781469634197

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469634197.001.0001

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O’Neal versus Williams and Reynolds versus McCook

O’Neal versus Williams and Reynolds versus McCook

Chapter:
(p.149) 8 O’Neal versus Williams and Reynolds versus McCook
Source:
The Battle of Peach Tree Creek
Author(s):

Earl J. Hess

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469634197.003.0008

Edward A. O'Neal's Brigade of Walthall's Division struck Alpheus S. Williams' division on Hooker's right. Williams was taken by surprise but his men reacted quickly to the attack. His division formed line in time to repulse several advances by O'Neal's troops with extremely heavy firing. Even though O'Neal handled his men well and they penetrated the wooded, uneven ground to Geary's right, they had to retire by the end of the day. Meanwhile, Daniel Harris Reynolds' Brigade of Walthall's Division advanced to the left of O'Neal against Anson McCook's brigade of Richard W. Johnson's Fourteenth Corps division. McCook's command was ready for action but one regiment, Douglas Hapeman's 104th Illinois, was forced by the configuration of the ground to be placed forward of the brigade's main line. This enabled part of Reynolds' line to almost flank the right of the 104th Illinois. Only by personally leading a counterattack could Hapeman save his flank just before reinforcements arrived to help him drive the Confederates away. On the far left of Hood's line, Samuel G. French's Division advanced two brigades toward the Fourteenth Corps line, to Reynolds' left, but they made little headway before the battle ended that day.

Keywords:   Alpheus S. Williams, Edward A. O'Neal, Daniel Harris Reynolds, Anson McCook, Richard W. Johnson, Douglas Hapeman, 104th Illinois, Samuel G. French

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