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The Virtues of ExitOn Resistance and Quitting Politics$
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Jennet Kirkpatrick

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781469635392

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469635392.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Expressive Exit

Expressive Exit

Thoreau

Chapter:
(p.48) 2 Expressive Exit
Source:
The Virtues of Exit
Author(s):

Jennet Kirkpatrick

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469635392.003.0003

This chapter explores the work of Henry David Thoreau, a figure who celebrates the benefits of extracting oneself from political life. It argues that Thoreau’s writings about exit reveal the possibility of a expressive exit, that is, a departure that is political in and of itself. For Thoreau, leaving a political community had the potential to illuminate the iniquitous, evil political agreements and institutions at its core. Thoreau was centrally concerned with the American institution of slavery; therefore, he frequently linked leaving with abolitionism in his writings. But his writings provide a more general understanding of the potentially disruptive effects of leaving in an expressive and ostentatious way, one that draws public attention to the exit itself and its connection with moral injustice.

Keywords:   Abolitionism, Withdrawal, Tax Resistance, Resistance, Civil Disobedience

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