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Science and Politics of Race in Mexico and the United States, 1910-1950$
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Karin Alejandra Rosemblatt

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469636405

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636405.001.0001

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From Cultural Pluralism to a Global Science of Acculturation in the United States

From Cultural Pluralism to a Global Science of Acculturation in the United States

Chapter:
(p.101) 3 From Cultural Pluralism to a Global Science of Acculturation in the United States
Source:
Science and Politics of Race in Mexico and the United States, 1910-1950
Author(s):

Karin Alejandra Rosemblatt

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636405.003.0004

This chapter focuses on Collier and the US Indian Service (IS). Collier brought applied anthology into the Indian Service so as to develop culturally appropriate policies—an innovation he claimed was inspired by what he saw in Mexico. Collier drew on examples of indirect colonial rule, including Spanish colonialism in New Spain, to further a scientific democratic governance of cultural and racial differences. Collier and others sought to promote and use democratic forms of Native leadership. During and after the Second World War, Collier, along with Laura Thompson and other academics, extended what they had learned regarding the management of ethnic difference to the Japanese-American internment camp at Poston, Arizona, which was run by the Indian Service, and, later, to U.S. “dependencies” abroad and “minorities” at home. This chapter charts the shift toward a more universalizing view of modernization and its application to diverse groups.

Keywords:   John Collier, Laura Thompson, United States Indian Service, Indirect colonial rule, Democracy, Native leadership, Japanese-American internment, Applied Anthropology, Ethnic minorities, U.S. dependencies

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